Africax5 Lifestyle | Learn How To Make Puff Puff

Posted on: April 6th, 2016 | by:

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Some call it beignet, some call it bofroat, some call it puff puff. Whatever you call them, you’ve either experienced or heard of peoples experience of this delicacy. Why not make them yourself?

Ingredients

  • 2 cups warm water
  • 2¼ teaspoon active dry yeast (1 packet)
  • 3½ cups flour
  • ½- 3/4 cup sugar
  • ½ Tbs salt
  • Oil for deep frying

Instructions

  1. Mix salt, sugar, water, and yeast . Set aside for 5 minutes
  2. Add flour and mix.
  3. Let the mixture rise for approximately 1- 2 hours
  4. In a large, sauce pan pour vegetable oil into a pot, until it is at least 3 inches (or about 5 centimeters) high (too little will result in flatter balls), and place on low heat.
  5. Test to make sure the oil is hot enough by putting a ‘drop’ of batter into the oil. If it is not hot enough, the batter will stay at the bottom of the pot rather than rising to the top.
  6. Using your hands grab a little bit of mixture at time and drop in the oil.
  7. When the oil is hot enough, use a spoon to dish up the batter, and another spoon or spatula to drop it in the oil, sort of in the shape of a ball.
  8. Fry for a few minutes until the bottom side is golden brown.
  9. Turn the ball over and fry for a few more minutes until the other side is golden brown.
  10. Use a large spoon or something like that to take it out of the oil. I usually place them on napkins right away to soak up some of the excess oil.
  11. If desired, you can roll the finished product in table sugar or powdered sugar to make it sweeter

Source: http://africanbites.com/puff-puff/

———

Joanna

@adjoanna_


AFricaX5: Cooking: Beverly Naya, Osas Ighodaro, Liz Awoliyi Celebrate As ‘Sweet Kiwi’ Turns One!

Posted on: March 16th, 2015 | by:

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Over the weekend, Sweet Kiwi Yogurt Frozen Yogurt located in Lekki Phase 1, Lagos, hosted some media personalities and friends to a delicious yogurt tasting session as part of its one year celebration in the business.

Present at the chilled out fun outing were Liz Awoliyi, Ono Bello, Samantha Dimka, Sharon Ojong, Beverly Naya, Osas Ighodaro, Anthonia Soares, Chizoba Okpala, Ezinne Alfa, Pepper Chikezie and many others.

Ehime Eigbe is the founder and Managing director of Sweet Kiwi frozen yogurt. She is a Goldman Sachs 10,000 women scholar, a public speaker and has taken part in several motivational speaker events to inspire youths and women. She also founded a volunteer organization called ‘Hands in Lagos’.
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Get involved in a Creative Entertainment Platform Africax5.tv

Posted on: February 23rd, 2015 | by:

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Hey you! Yes… you! Are you a looking to get involved in a creative Entertainment Platform that is created for youth and run by youth?

Here at Africax5.tv, we aim to provide a fresh new take on TV, Film and Media that empowers and connects youth from Africa to the UK though Afro beats to Afro events! Following trends from African countries and bringing together a selection of projects that celebrates diversity is just part of the many successes to come out of Africax5.tv.

 


That’s not all…

With support from the Mayor of London, HRH Prince Charles and Bafta Winner Chiwetel Ejiofor, Africax5.TV is a proven platform for the up and coming and the budding CREATIVES who want to be involved in shaping the future for young people in the entertainment industry.

Still interested? Email us and see how you can get involved at info@africax5.tv.

Also drop us a tweet at @AfricaX5 and like our Facebook page ‘Ax5 Group’ for more information on this incredible platform.

So what are you waiting for? Join the movement.


Read: Africax5.tv Cooking: Recipe for Jollof rice with plantains

Posted on: January 12th, 2015 | by:

Jollof rice with fried plantains

Jollof rice is found throughout West Africa and is thought to be the origin of the Cajun dish, jambalaya. Serve with fried plantains and a crisp green salad.

Ingredients

For the rice
1 tbsp olive or vegetable oil
2 large onions, sliced
2 x 400g/14oz cans plum tomatoes
1 red pepper, diced
4 tbsp tomato purée
¼ tsp cayenne pepper or chilli powder
1 tsp curry powder
1 bay leaf
spring fresh thyme
1 stock cube
225g/8oz long-grain or basmati rice
salt and freshly ground black pepper
 

And serve with 2 plantains, cut into slices and deep fried with green leaf salad

 

Preparation method

  1.  For the rice, heat the oil in a large pan and cook the onions over a gentle heat until translucent.
  2.  Stir in the canned tomatoes, red pepper and tomato purée, then season with salt, freshly ground black pepper and the cayenne or chilli. Add the curry powder, bay leaf and thyme, then pour in 550ml/19fl oz of water and crumble in the stock cube.
  3.  Cover and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 20–30 minutes.
  4.  Rinse the rice well to remove excess starch, then add it to the tomato mixture.
  5.  Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to low. Cover and simmer for 25–30 minutes, or until the rice is cooked.
  6.  Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper and serve the joffol with fried plantains and a crisp green salad. Then Enjoy!

 

Source: bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/


Read: Africax5.tv Cooking: Godsend bakery brings fresh twist to Goma life

Posted on: November 4th, 2014 | by:

November 3, 2014 — Updated 1153 GMT (1953 HKT)
Another issue Jados encountered when setting up her bakery was the lack of skilled workers in the town. At just 27 years old, the business woman says she wants to employ young people and give them a change to learn new skills and develop. Another issue Jados encountered when setting up her bakery was the lack of skilled workers in the town. At just 27 years old, the business woman says she wants to employ young people and give them a change to learn new skills and develop.
Looking ahead

 

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Vanessa Jados has established the “Au Bon Pain” bakery in Goma, DRC
  • The capital of North Kivu province has experienced war and destruction after a volcano erupted
  • Difficulties with electricity, water and skills shortages make running the business challenging
  • Jados says that Congolese people need to remain positive and build a better country

Every week, African Start-Up follows entrepreneurs in various countries across the continent to see how they are working to make their business dreams become reality.

(CNN) — Conflict and hardship have long made Goma a difficult place to live in, but one woman has set out to change that — and she’s using soft croissants and fresh coffee.

When Vanessa Jados opened the “Au Bon Pain” bakery in May, she brought something new to the residents of the town in the far east of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Six months on, she is showing no signs of shutting up shop.

“Goma is my home,” says Jados, 27. “I am very proud of Goma. It’s the most beautiful part of Democratic Republic of Congo, and people here need fresh bread just like people in Europe.”

Nestled between a mountainous national park and a freshwater lake, Goma sounds like the ideal setting for a holiday and the perfect place for a bakery. But the determined entrepreneur has had to overcome electricity, supply and staffing problems to make her dream a reality.

“Au Bon Pain” is Goma’s first high-end bakery.
Vanessa Merlo

Goma’s troubles

Born in Goma, Jados was sent by her parents to study in Belgium at the age of 12. “I had been to Belgium once before with my family, but that time it was just me and my two sisters,” she recalls. “Leaving my parents behind was tough.”

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Jados wasn’t to return home for 11 years. During her absence, Goma felt the horrific effects of the 1994 genocide in neighboring Rwanda as refugees fled across the nearby border.

By the end of the 1990s an armed rebel movement called RCD-Goma were running the town, and Human Rights Watch says the group forcibly recruited child soldiers to wage war in the politically unstable region where Uganda, Rwanda and the DRC meet.

As the armed conflict rumbled on in January 2002, molten lava spewed out of the nearby Mount Nyiragongo and quickly spread to the town. Approximately 400,000 people were forced to flee and a third of the city was destroyed by the flames.

Goma’s residents began to rebuild the town after the natural disaster, but the M23 rebel group briefly occupied it in 2012 and waged war with Congolese armed forces. Human Rights Watch documented summary executions as well as numerous cases of violent sexual abuse.

Inside the “Au Bon Pain” bakery in Goma.
Vanessa Merlo

Business beginnings

Returning to Goma at 23, Jados saw a very different place to the town she had left. High quality food products were in short supply, as were clean water and electricity. The challenges didn’t stop her from focusing on her goal of establishing the first high-end bakery in town.

“Two years before I opened the doors I started raising money,” she explains. “I needed to get an oven and mixing machine from Italy.”

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Another essential ingredient she couldn’t find locally was a skilled baker, so she convinced a baker from the French town of Toulouse to move to Goma. “Young people in Goma aren’t well trained or educated,” she says. “I want to help young people learn new skills so the baker is training a Congolese baker and a woman who makes cakes.”

Jados continues: “Congolose people are very nice and always smiling. Their current difficulties aren’t as bad as they were during the war, so people are very happy. They really want to learn new skills and are very happy to learn from the French baker.”

While she can’t run her business without materials from abroad, like brown flour and chocolate, Jados uses local products where she can. “I can find white flour in Goma,” she explains. “And the butter I use comes from my family’s farm about an hour away. The butter isn’t sold in shops, but they produce enough for the bakery.”

Heavenly croissants

Like the materials she uses, the customers Jados serves are a mixture of local and foreign.

Having experienced such hardship, Goma has become a center for NGOs and charities in the region. The continued presence of expats has impacted the local economy and caused some price hikes for certain services like hotels and drivers. “In the beginning, most of the customers were expats,” Jados recognizes. “But more Congolese people are coming these days — they like the fresh bread and the birthday cakes as well.”

For Anne-France White, a half-French, half-American aid worker living in Goma, “Au Bon Pain” is a “godsend.” She says: “It’s literally the only place in town to get good croissants, tasty sandwiches and genuinely good bread…The only thing they need to improve is the slow service — if they find a way to make it speedy and efficient, the place will be pretty much perfect.”

Local people need to stay here and create a better Congo.
Vanessa Jados, Owner of “Au Bon Pain” Bakery

But not all the issues the aid-workers have come to help resolve are fixed. “It’s hard to set up something that’s got good foundations,” Jados says. “It is difficult. There’s lots of tax which makes things expensive. The electricity always cuts out, so I had to buy a big generator which was expensive and [it] also uses fuel which is very expensive. Water is also a problem.”

And if these issues weren’t enough, as well as a full-time business owner, Jados is a full-time mum of two. “I was pregnant when I was setting up the bakery,” she says. “I now have a three month year old daughter, and I have to care for her too.”

Despite her heavy workload, Jados is resolute that she’s doing the right thing. “We can never be sure the war won’t start again,” she says. “We don’t know, but we must continue. We must do the schools, the hospitals, the restaurants. We have to keep a positive mindset and make sure Congolese people don’t go to Europe. Local people need to stay here and create a better Congo.”


Read : Africax5.tv Cooking : PLANTAIN DISHES FROM ALL OVER THE CONTINENT

Posted on: November 4th, 2014 | by:

[SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA] The diversity of African cultures is a testament to its size, population and history.  Each region asserts itself on grounds of language, beliefs and even physical traits; but, when we step into the kitchen of any African home, there is one common feature – plantain. Plantains are one of, if not the essential staple in Africa. Why shouldn’t they be? Plantains are easy to prepare. They can be eaten ripe (sweet) or unripe (savoury). They flourish in humid, tropical climates. They are also affordable. To top things off, plantains are low in fat and high in dietary fibre.  Africa Food Daily took a peek into the ‘kitchens’ of several African homes and was bowled over by the creativity and ingenuity with which plantains are prepared. Take a look at what we discovered and chances are, after reading this blog, you’ll be in the kitchen whipping up your favorite plantain dish! What would that be?

Northeastern Congolese Lokele Lituman (pounded plantain balls eaten with fish and stew) Image Source-  http://www.marga.org

Northeastern Congolese Lokele Lituman (pounded plantain balls eaten with fish and stew)
Image Source- http://www.marga.org

Ghanaian Tatale (ginger-seasoned plantain fritters). Served with black eyed beans stew. Image Source- http://sahanimagazine.com

Ghanaian Tatale (ginger-seasoned plantain fritters). Served with black eyed beans stew.
Image Source- http://sahanimagazine.com

Ivorian Aloko (fried plantain served as a side or main dish with grilled fish and tomato sauce) Image Source- http://www.likeresto.fr

Ivorian Aloko (fried plantain served as a side or main dish with grilled fish and tomato sauce)
Image Source- http://www.likeresto.fr

Tanzanian Supu Ya Ndizi (Plantain soup – a warm starter to any meal)

Tanzanian Supu Ya Ndizi (Plantain soup – a warm starter to any meal) Image Source- http://lukemusicfactory.blogspot.fr

Eastern Nigeria’s Ukpo Egede or Moin Moin (‘a savoury plantain pudding’ cooked in banana leaves) Image Source- http://www.nairaland.com

Eastern Nigeria’s Ukpo Egede or Moin Moin (‘a savoury plantain pudding’ cooked in banana leaves)
Image Source- http://www.nairaland.com

Liberian Rice-bread Image Source- http://recipiesfromovertheworld.blogspot.fr

Liberian Rice-bread
Image Source- http://recipiesfromovertheworld.blogspot.fr

Togolese Plantain fufu et sauce arachide (pounded plantain and spicy peanut soup) Image Source- http://www.mytripblog.org

Togolese Plantain fufu et sauce arachide (pounded plantain and spicy peanut soup) Image Source- http://www.mytripblog.org

Nigerian Kekefia Unripe Plantain Porridge http://www.wivestownhallconnection.com

Nigerian Kekefia Unripe Plantain Porridge
Image Source- http://www.wivestownhallconnection.com

Image Source-http://campusdining.blogspot.fr/ Cameroonian Poulet Directeur General (DG)

Cameroonian Poulet Directeur General (DG) Image Source-http://campusdining.blogspot.fr

Ghanaian kelewele Image Source- http://timinghana.wordpress.com

Ghanaian kelewele
Image Source- http://timinghana.wordpress.com

Seychelles’ Ladob Banan Image Source- http://pinterest.com

Seychelles’ Ladob Banan
Image Source- http://pinterest.com

Ivorian Pain de banane plantain Image Source- http://sahanimagazine.com

Ivorian Pain de banane plantain
Image Source- http://sahanimagazine.com

Equatorial Guinean Platano Macho Frito (plantain deep fried in red palm oil) Image Source-http://www.celtnet.org.uk

Equatorial Guinean Platano Macho Frito (plantain deep fried in red palm oil)
Image Source-http://www.celtnet.org.uk

 

 Nigerian Dodo Oni-Yeri Image Source- ttps://www.facebook.com

Nigerian Dodo Oni-Yeri
Image Source- ttps://www.facebook.com

Plantain Chips Image Source- http://costaricachica.wordpress.com

Plantain Chips (thin slices of fried unripe plantain eaten alone or with a sweet or spicy dip)
Image Source- http://costaricachica.wordpress.com

Tanzanian Ndizi Na Yama (Plantains cooked with beef curry and coconut milk) Image Source- http://lukemusicfactory.blogspot.fr

Tanzanian Ndizi Na Yama (Plantains cooked with beef curry and coconut milk)
Image Source- http://lukemusicfactory.blogspot.fr

Ugandan Matoke (plantains steamed in their leaves until tender; eaten with or without meat) Image Source- http://news.travelhouseuk.co.uk

Ugandan Matoke (plantains steamed in their leaves until tender; eaten with or without meat)
Image Source- http://news.travelhouseuk.co.uk

Malawian Zituwmba (plantain fritters made from a cornmeal batter) Image Source- http://www.justbestrecipes.com

Malawian Zituwmba (plantain fritters made from a cornmeal batter)
Image Source- http://www.justbestrecipes.com

Tanzanian Ndizi Kanga (fried plantain sprinkled brown sugar and cinnamon) Image Source- http://www.madeinkitchen.tv

Tanzanian Ndizi Kanga (fried plantain sprinkled brown sugar and cinnamon)
Image Source- http://www.madeinkitchen.tv

Congolese Makala  Ma Missolé (ripe plantain doughnuts – eaten as a snack or with any meal) Image Source- http://paradisdusoleil.skyrock.com

Congolese Makala Ma Missolé (ripe plantain doughnuts – eaten as a snack or with any meal)
Image Source- http://paradisdusoleil.skyrock.com

Burundian Haricots au plantain (Beans & plantain - a blend of kidney beans and plantains cooked in red palm oil)  Image Source- http://www.savourezlemonde.com

Burundian Haricots au plantain (Beans & plantain – a blend of kidney beans and plantains cooked in red palm oil)
Image Source- http://www.savourezlemonde.com

East Africa’s Mtori Image Source- http://foodforfasting.com

East Africa’s Mtori
Image Source- http://foodforfasting.com

Written by Mary Krow Loanga-Balamba. After a legal career in London, Mary relocated  Paris where she lectures at a university. Find her on Twitter @MaKuisine
Source: http://africastyledaily.com


Read: Africax5.tv Cooking: Diverse African Cuisines

Posted on: October 21st, 2014 | by:

Curators of Fine African Tea

The first time I heard was Yswara was in a documentary of an executive developmental class (I forget which one). The founder, Swaady Martin-Leke, struck me as a real Afropolitan. She’s a mix of cultures and experiences from all her …

 

 

 

 

Comoros: Poulet au Coco

Poulet au Coco simply means Chicken with Coconut. It’s a simple classic meal from Comoros, lovingly and experimentally made by Eat the Olympics (who aim to eat their way round all the countries in the London 2012 Olympics). Try out …

 

 

Coconut Rice is a bit of a common-special dish in Nigeria. I always thought it was weird mixing Coconut and Rice together… but this dish though, you should try it. This is from Lohi’s Creation, the awesome food and …

 

 

Peppered Snail

I’m not usually a fan of snails, a delicacy in Nigeria, but I must admit that with lots of spice, it’s great. This Peppered Snail recipe is by genius cook, Lohi. Ingredients 1 onion (finely chopped) 3 scotch bonnet pepper …

 

Pounded Yam

Pounded Yam is the one food that is inarguably African. The whole process of preparing it and eating it is representative of the traditional African community life. As the name implies, pounded yam is prepared by…well, pounding yam. A mortar …

Jollof Rice

Jollof Rice Ingredients: 1/3 cup pure Groundnut oil * ¼ of a large onion (sliced) 1 small can tomato paste 2 cubes magi ½ teaspoon each (Thyme, curry, chilli powder) 1teaspoon salt *to taste 4 bay leaves 2.5 cups basmati …

 

Curried Coconut Soup

African Curried Coconut Soup with Chickpeas Serves 5-6, adapted from the Tropical Vegan Kitchen 1 1/2 cups raw chickpeas, black-eyed peas or a mix, soaked overnight 1 cup millet, quinoa, or brown rice (I used millet!) 2 tbsp olive oil…

Akara for Breakfast

Akara is practically a staple food in Nigeria. It is usually eaten for breakfast (along with custard or pap) or as a snack. It’s pretty simple to prepare as well. The ingredients are listed below, as well as the link …

 

 

Experience Africa in Akhaya Cookery School

The number of meals in Nigeria alone surprises me, not to talk of the whole of Africa. There are so many kinds of soup that I go cross-eyed just thinking of the ones I’ve never tried. All are made from …

 

 

Food Heaven with Wendy and Jess

Food Heaven Made Easy with Wendy & Jess is a new and innovative cooking series. It shows monthly Brooklyn Community Access Television (BCAT) and was created by Wendy Lopez and Jessica Jones, two beautiful Nutrition Educators. The series is aimed …


Read: Africax5.tv Cooking: Curried Coconut Soup

Posted on: October 20th, 2014 | by:

African Curried Coconut Soup with Chickpeas
Serves 5-6, adapted from the Tropical Vegan Kitchen

1 1/2 cups raw chickpeas, black-eyed peas or a mix, soaked overnight
1 cup millet, quinoa, or brown rice (I used millet!)
2 tbsp olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
1 medium red bell pepper, chopped
1 jalapeno chili, seeded and finely chopped
2 large cloves garlic, finely chopped
3 cups vegetable broth
2 tomatoes, chopped
1 tbsp curry powder (I used a medium hot blend that I got from my local Indian market)
1/2 tsp salt
freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 lb mixed greens – kale, collards, mustard greens, swiss chard
1 (14 oz) can light coconut milk

Find the recipe on Joan Eats Well With Others


Read: Africax5.tv Cooking: Curators of Fine African Tea

Posted on: October 20th, 2014 | by:

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The first time I heard was Yswara was in a documentary of an executive developmental class
(I forget which one). The founder, Swaady Martin-Leke, struck me as a real Afropolitan.
She’s a mix of cultures and experiences from all her moving about. And her signature head
wraps were refreshing!

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What impressed me most though, was Yswara. African tea is quite an obscure niche and to be honest, I haven’t ever thought of Africa having an assortment of indigenous teas. What’s more, all the staff are women!

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Yswara, curators of precious African teas, can provide you with a host of teas made from a combination of African tea leaves of a wide variety. They sell retail and wholesale, and will also cater to your event.

Shop Yswara here


Read: Africax5.tv Cooking: Jerk Chicken

Posted on: June 4th, 2014 | by:

Jerk chicken

Pour this authentic spicy marinade over chicken, seafood or even aubergines to make them come over all Caribbean.
Ingredients
6 chicken breasts, or chicken thighs, bones removed
For the sauce
225g/8oz onions, quartered
1-1½ scotch bonnet or other chillies according to taste, halved and seeded
50g/2oz root ginger, peeled and chopped roughly
½ tsp ground allspice
small bunch fresh thyme, leaves only
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
120ml/4fl oz white wine vinegar
120ml/4fl oz dark soy sauce
To serve
rice and peas
1 pineapple, peeled, cored and cut in wedges
4 limes, 3 cut in wedges, 1 juice only
Preparation method
Put all the ingredients for the Jerk Sauce in a food processor and whiz until smooth.
Place the chicken in a large shallow dish, pour over the sauce, cover and leave to marinate in the fridge overnight.
On a hot griddle cook the chicken for 25-30 minutes, basting now and then with the leftover sauce. As it cooks, the thick sauce will go quite black in places, but don’t worry, as it falls off it will leave behind a really well flavoured, crisp skin, with lovely moist tender meat underneath.
Brush the pineapple lightly with oil and char grill until golden brown on all sides. Squeeze over the juice of one lime.
Serve the jerk chicken with the rice and peas, pineapple and wedges of lime on the side